How to categorize your strategies by exit type quickly and efficiently

Author: clonex

December 17th, 2020

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Exit methods databank columns snippets bundle

StrategyQuant X can generate a large number of strategies based on several input parameters. One of them is the option to choose different exit methods ( Exit Types)  from which StrategyQuant X selects.

 

 

The result of generating strategies in BUILDER or retesting in RETESTER can be a large number of strategies with different types of exits. The question is how to categorize these strategies by their exits.  Until now, the only possible way was to do it manually by analyzing after strategy.  ( without external scripts… )

This bundle of databank column snippets can be a new solution which can help you identify Exit Methods used in the strategy. They return the percentage share of a specific exit method from all exit methods used in every strategy.

Another promising usage is to use these snippets as fitness in strategy builder. You should be able to tell StrategyQuant X genetic builder engine which strategies should be preferred during the building process.

Exit Complexity

Another useful tool is Exit complexity a snippet – databank column that returns a summation of the used exit methods. Theoretically, if the simpler strategy is more robust, then a lower exit complexity should indicate a more robust strategy. Again, it can be used as a fitness function.

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GRoundofInferno
GRoundofInferno
5 months ago

thank you Clonex for great work. Very valuable snippets

Jason
Jason
5 months ago

Gratefully received as always. Thanks Clonex for your continued efforts in improving the software.

kasinath
kasinath
5 months ago

This is a great contribution to the community. Thanks for sharing this!

GaryAitcheson
GaryAitcheson
5 months ago

Thank you for this! Is the exit complexity column called “Exit quality?” Lower is better, right?